February 2009


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Arctic Thunder will be playing at

The Coal Miner’s Ball 

April 25th, 2009

The Alpine Inn

Sutton, AK

 

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Arctic Thunder was born in 1999, when James Spradlin  and Missy Baltes met and decided to create a band. By mixing James’ rock, heavy metal, and blues background with Missy’s folk, country, and classical styles, they created a unique sound. They debuted Arctic Thunder in June of 2000 at Lynx Pizza in Denali National Park, and have been storming Alaska ever since!
 

Arctic Thunder has played many venues from Seward to Healy and Lake Louise, including, Wolverine Lodge at Lake Louise, The Longhorn Saloon in Cantwell, The Totem in Healy, The Alpine Inn in Sutton, The Caboose Lounge in Palmer, The Talkeetna Bluegrass Festival, and The Alaska State Fair.
 
We play all kinds of music

for every occasion —

Birthdays,

Weddings,

Anniversaries,

— all your special events!
 

From Patsy Cline

and Hank Williams

to Shania Twain

and Garth Brooks,

Chuck Berry to AC/DC to

Nirvana, plus our

Alaskan originals,

we’re sure to have

something you like!
 

Visit our music page

to hear some of

our music, and see

a more complete

list of songs.

View Arctic Thunder Web Site

 

James Spradlin

Vocalist/Guitarist/Songwriter/Harmonica/

Percussionist/Lap Steel/Mandolin

James grew up in Alaska, and has been playing with rock bands since the early 1980’s. From soulful blues to searing rock leads,James can play any style of music! He has also been an instrument repairman specializing in electric and acousitc guitars for more than 20 years. In fact, he met his wife when she brought her guitar into the store where he was working!
 

Missy Spradlin

Vocalist/Guitarist/Songwriter/Flutist/

Percussionist

Missy grew up in Middleton, Wisconsin, and she began singing as soon as she could talk! She started playing the flute when she was ten years old, and she picked up the guitar later on. After graduating from the University of Wisconsin, in May of 1991, with a bachelor’s degree in elementary education, Missy “ran away" to Alaska, to spend the summer in Denali National Park. She ended up staying in Alaska permanently, where she met her husband, James Spradlin. Missy has played at various places in the Anchorage area including,Border’s Books & Music,The Snow City Cafe and The Fairview Inn in Talkeetna. She has also played at the Fairbanks Summer Music Festival, and at the McKinley Music Festival in Cantwell.

Arctic Thunder

 

See Coal Miner’s Ball in Table of Contents

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Only in Alaska ……. This guy raised an abandoned moose calf with his horses, and believe it or not, he has trained it for lumber removal and other hauling tasks. Given the 2,000 pounds of robust muscle, and the splayed, grippy hooves, he claims it is the best work animal he has. He says the secret to keeping the moose around is a sweet salt lick, although, during the rut he disappears for a couple of weeks, but always comes back home…..

Impressive !!

Moose

ALASKAN CLYDESDALE
Bound to be someone out there that will raise some issues with this treatment of a wild animal. To them I say. “If the Moose keeps coming back, what’s the problem?”

23rd Annual

The Coal Miner’s Ball

Saturday April 25th, 2009


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The Alpine Historical Society in conjunction with The Sutton Activity Coordination Board sponsor this event. The Coal Miner’s Ball, will be held at the Alpine Inn at mile 61 of the Glenn Highway, in Sutton, Saturday, April 25th.

The Coal Miners Ball is The Alpine Historical Society’s largest fund raising event of the year.  It is designed to honor those that came before us with a Old Timers Induction to Hall of Fame, entertainment, a potlatch, dinner, dancing and door prizes.

The Alpine Historical Society has been managing the Alpine Historical Park since 1984, when land exchanged between Phil O’Neill and the Mat-Su Borough.  The Park is uniquely situated directly on the Glenn Highway at mile post 61.6 and Chickaloon Way in Sutton Alaska.  The local Glenn Highway National Scenic Byways Committee has selected The Historic O’Neill House to represent this area as the Glenn Highway Scenic Byway Visitors Center.  This important Historic Park is 23 minutes from Palmer and a beautiful one hour drive from Anchorage.

The tax deductible contribution is $12.50 advance, $15.00 at the door, per person, children 5 and under free.  Tickets include Dinner, induction, entertainment and door prizes.  Doors open at 4PM. This year we have two bands starting at 7PM The Bruce Finlay’s Black N’ Tan Band and Arctic Thunder at 9PM.  Proceeds from this event will provide local activities for young people and families in the Sutton – Chickaloon area. As well as to maintain programs and facilities at the Alpine Historical Park.

Senior Citizens Discount Tickets are available.  Advance Tickets will be on sale at local businesses throughout Wasilla, Palmer, Sutton and Anchorage. Look for our poster displayed.

Call 746 – 7461 Ask for Rebecca  or email alpinehistoricalsociety@hotmail.com for more information.

A Trip To Alaska oct-nov 2008 410

The Greater Cause
Some Good Reasons for Doing Good

With all that takes place in our lives, it can sometimes be easy to overlook the fact that we’re part of something greater than ourselves—a collective consciousness, the Universe, a greater cause. Because of our tendency to forget this, we might make decisions in our lives that don’t reflect that responsibility that comes with this belonging. All too often, we focus just on the short-term, tangible gain to ourselves without worrying about its consequences. Other times, we may discard the greater cause because it seems like “hard work.” The challenge is to expand our minds so that we transcend the distinction between self and others, so we are aware of how our choices and actions can impact a greater cause.

Contributing to the greater cause doesn’t have to be all about self-sacrifice. For example, if you plant a tree in a community space, its shelter will cool and protect you as well as your neighbors. Or, your reward might be in the form of the beauty that you now see in that space or the sincere smiles of appreciation from neighbors. When you serve the greater cause you also serve your greater good. There is nothing that you cannot do for your highest good that will not benefit the good of all. For example, saying no to a relationship that isn’t right for you not only benefits you but serves the greater good of the other person that you are honoring with your honesty. Saying yes to your dream job not only fulfills you but also serves the people that will benefit from your enthusiasm and productivity.

When you know you are serving a greater cause, there is little room for fear and doubt. You know that what you do will benefit others, so there is no way the universe is not going to support your efforts – even if sometimes it may not look that way. Serving the greater cause allows you to live from the space of your greatness. When you know that what you do can serve a greater cause, you are aware of your power and ability to influence and create change in this world.

A Trip To Alaska oct-nov 2008 359 (800x600)

The Community of Sutton has long been in need of a new community facility to serve as both a Library and a Community Resource Center.

Sutton Community Resource Center Location:
PO Box 266
Sutton Alaska 99674

Phone:
907 745-4467

Email:
Sutton Library

 

The building we are currently housed in was formerly the Sutton Fire Hall.  It is more than 30 years and 2,250 square feet it has become too small to house an adequate library collection or provide space to our community for programming needs.

In September of 2002, the community of Sutton began its quest for a new facility. The Matanuska-Susitna Borough has secured a piece of property for the new facility and we have a conceptual design completed.

The Alpine Historical Park located adjacent to the new library site will be sharing our facility’s infrastructure.  The Historic O’Neil House, situated on The Alpine Historical Park property has been identified as the selected site, by the Glenn Highway Byways Committee as the Glenn Highway Visitors Center.

 

08049 perspectives

 

The current library is the center of our community:

It is our Community Resource Center

We provide a variety of services for the entire community. 

Our regular library services include:

 

  • A Summer Reading Program
  • Pre-School Story Hours
  • Teen Programming
  • Baby Lap-Sit
  • After School Programming
  • Adult Book Club
  • Foreign Film Club
  • Adult Programming
  • Fly – Tying
  • Travel
  • Energy
  • Satellite Job Service Center
  • Public Health Clinic’s
  • Programming to Local Elementary Schools
  • Delivering Mat-Su Borough Forms and Services
  • Provide Meeting Space
  • Offer wireless Service
  • Copy Machines, Fax and notary services

We anticipate the total budget for this project to be $3,2 million. To date we have received funding and commitment in the amount of $765,572.

We need your support and donations to complete our project.  Any money donated could be used for purposes you specify or deferral of construction costs.

 

     Mile .1 Jonesville Road

Sutton CommunityMap cropped (2) 

The Sutton Community Resource Center is currently on the Mat-Su Borough’s Capital Improvement List which has been submitted to the Alaska State Legislature.  We are hopeful that the bill was passed, SB119 sponsored by Senator Bert Stedman and will receive funding this year.

 

The Mat-Su Borough has included the Sutton Community Resource Center on their priority list of Federal Economic Stimulus Projects, submitted to our US Congressional delegation.

 

Please Write to our list of Legislators of your support for this project, any donations would be appreciated.

We look forward to the challenge of this proposal, increasing our size while maintaining the atmosphere and the values of our community.

We thank you for your consideration

Click on Links Below to email your support letter

Representative Don Young

Representative John Harris

Representative Wes Keller

Senator Be​rt Stedman

Senator Ch​arlie Huggi​ns

Senator Ge​ne Therriau​lt

Senator Li​nda Menard

Senator Lisa Murkowski

Senator Mark Begich

Representative Bill Stoltze

Representative Mark Neuman

Representative Carl Gatto

Sen. Menard to Appear at Town Hall Meeting.

Wasilla – Sen. Linda Menard will take questions and comments from constituents. Saturday February 21st.

The Meeting comes one week after a heavily attended, wide-ranging town hall meeting Feb. 14,  Sen. Menard said she was very pleased by the turnout at the Valentin’s Day meeting and hopes as many people, or more, will show up to this Saturday’s forum.

Menard will appear along side Reps. Mark Neuman and Wes Keller and will cover any issues brought up by those in attendance.

The meeting is scheduled to run from 12N to 2PM at the Wasilla Legislative Information Office at 600 E. Railroad Ave.

For inquires contact Michael Rovito at 465 -5078, or email

For more information

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The Last Great Race on Earth

You can’t compare it to any other competitive event in the world! A race over 1150 miles of the roughest, most beautiful terrain Mother Nature has to offer. She throws jagged mountain ranges, frozen river, dense forest, desolate tundra and miles of windswept coast at the mushers and their dog teams. Add to that temperatures far below zero, winds that can cause a complete loss of visibility, the hazards of overflow, long hours of darkness and treacherous climbs and side hills, and you have the Iditarod. A race extraordinaire, a race only possible in Alaska.

From Anchorage, in south central Alaska, to Nome on the western Bering Sea coast, each team of 12 to 16 dogs and their musher cover over 1150 miles in 10 to 17 days.

It has been called the “Last Great Race on Earth” and it has won worldwide acclaim and interest. German, Spanish, British, Japanese and American film crews have covered the event. Journalists from outdoor magazines, adventure magazines, newspapers and wire services flock to Anchorage and Nome to record the excitement. It’s not just a dog sled race, it’s a race in which unique men and woman compete. Mushers enter from all walks of life. Fishermen, lawyers, doctors, miners, artists, natives, Canadians, Swiss, French and others; men and women each with their own story, each with their own reasons for going the distance. It’s a race organized and run primarily by volunteers, thousands of volunteers, men and women, students and village residents. They man headquarters at Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, Nome and Wasilla. They fly volunteers, veterinarians, dog food and supplies. They act as checkers, coordinators, and family supporters of each musher.

The Spirit of Alaska!

More Than a Race…

It’s a Commemoration

The race pits man and animal against nature, against wild Alaska at her best and as each mile is covered, a tribute to Alaska’s past is issued.

The Iditarod is a tie to — a commemoration of — that colorful past.

The Iditarod Trail, now a National Historic Trail, had its beginnings as a mail and supply route from the coastal towns of Seward and Knik to the interior mining camps at Flat, Ophir, Ruby and beyond to the west coast communities of Unalakleet, Elim, Golovin, White Mountain and Nome. Mail and supplies went in. Gold came out. All via dog sled. Heroes were made, legends were born.

In 1925, part of the Iditarod Trail became a life saving highway for epidemic-stricken Nome. Diphtheria threatened and serum had to be brought in; again by intrepid dog mushers and their faithful hard-driving dogs.

The Iditarod is a commemoration of those yesterdays, a not-so-distant past that Alaskans honor and are proud of.

An Event for All Alaska

Anchorage is the starting line — a city of over 250,000 people, street lights, freeways and traffic. From there the field of dog teams which grow in number each year, runs to Eagle River, Checkpoint # 1. After a restart in the Matanuska Valley at Wasilla, the mushers leave the land of highways and bustling activity and head out to the Yentna Station Roadhouse and Skwentna and then up! Through Finger Lake, Rainy Pass, over the Alaska Range and down the other side to the Kuskokwim River — Rohn Roadhouse, Nikolai, McGrath, Ophir, Cripple, Iditarod and on to the mighty Yukon — a river highway that takes the teams west through the arctic tundra.

The race route is alternated every other year, one year going north through Cripple, Ruby and Galena, the next year south through Iditarod, Shageluk, Anvik.

Finally, they’re on the coast — Unalakleet, Shaktoolik, Koyuk, Elim, Golovin, White Mountain and into Nome where a hero’s welcome is the custom for musher number 1 or 61!

The route encompasses large metropolitan areas and small native villages. It causes a yearly spurt of activity, increased airplane traffic and excitement to areas otherwise quiet and dormant during the long Alaskan winter. Everyone gets involved, from very young school children to the old timers who relive the colorful Alaskan past they’ve known as they watch each musher and his team. The race is an educational opportunity and an economic stimulus to these small Alaskan outposts.

The “I” logo, a trademark of the Iditarod Trail Committee, Inc. and the Iditarod Race, was designed by Alaskan artist Bill DeVine in the early years of the race. The design is done on a white background with blue thread for the dog and inner outline. The Outer outline is done in red. The design is used on a shield in some instances and that variation was used on wooden trail markers in the earlier races.

On the Trail

Every musher has a different tactic. Each one has a special menu for feeding and snacking the dogs. Each one has a different strategy — some run in the daylight, some run at night. Each one has a different training schedule and his own ideas on dog care, dog stamina and his own personal ability.

The rules of the race lay out certain regulations which each musher must abide by. There are certain pieces of equipment each team must have — an arctic parka, a heavy sleeping bag, an ax, snowshoes, musher food, dog food and boots for each dog’s feet to protect against cutting ice and hard packed snow injuries.

Some mushers spend an entire year getting ready and raising the money needed to get to Nome. Some prepare around a full-time job. In addition to planning the equipment and feeding needs for up to three weeks on the trail, hundreds of hours and hundreds of miles of training have to be put on each team.

There are names which are automatically associated with the race — Joe Redington, Sr., co-founder of the classic and affectionately know as “Father of the Iditarod.” Rick Swenson from Two River, Alaska, the only five time winner, the only musher to have entered 20 Iditarod races and never finished out of the top ten. Dick Mackey from Nenana who beat Swenson by one second in 1978 to achieve the impossible photo finish after two weeks on the trail. Norman Vaughan who at the age of 88 has finished the race four times and led an expedition to Antarctica in the winter of 93–94. Four time winner, Susan Butcher, was the first woman to ever place in the top 10. And of course, Libby Riddles, the first woman to win the Iditarod in 1985.

There are others — Herbie Nayokpuk, Shishmaref; Emmitt Peters, Ruby, whose record set in 1975 was not broken until 1980, when Joe May, Trapper Creek, knocked seven hours off the record… the flying Anderson’s, Babe and Eep, from McGrath.. Rick Mackey, who wearing his father Dick’s winning #13, crossed the finish line first in 1983, making them the only father and son to have both won an Iditarod… Joe Runyan, 1989 champion and the only musher to have won the Alpirod (European long distance race), the Yukon Quest, (long distance race between Fairbanks and Whitehorse, YT) and the Iditarod… Terry Adkins, retired from the United States Air Force, the only veterinarian on the first Iditarod and one of the two musher to have completed 20 out of 23 Iditarods. (The other is Rick Swenson.) The list goes on, each name bringing with it a tale of adventure, a feeling of accomplishment, a touch of hero. Each musher, whether in the top ten, or winner of the Red Lantern (last place) has accomplished a feat few dare to attempt. Each has gone the distance and established a place for their team in the annals of Iditarod lore.

For all the up to date information

The Official Iditarod Web Site

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